Alpha Kappa Chi, 1917-1918
Concordian article, 1942
Homecoming Queen Nancy Jensen and her attendants, 1957
Co-ed Dormitories
Fjelstad Hall
Women's League, 1936
Park Region Hall

Welcome!

Currently under development, Cordopedia is a digital encyclopedia of Concordia College history. The first phase of Cordopedia focuses on the people, places, events, and things connected to women throughtout the college's history. The site will be formally unveiled in March 2017 for Women's History Month.

Questions or suggestions? Please contact the site developers: Lisa Sjoberg (sjoberg@cord.edu) and Joy Lintelman (lintelma@cord.edu).

Recently Added Entries

Richard Green, a 1961 Concordia graduate and Chemistry faculty from 1969-1972A native of Louisville, Kentucky, Richard Green attended Concordia College during the tumult and excitement of the early modern Civil Rights Movement, becoming the college’s first African American graduate in 1961. A chemistry major, Green went on to earn a master’s degree in science at North Dakota State University (1963) and his PhD in the field of inorganic chemistry at the University of Louisville (1969). In 1964, Green married Dorothy Reed and began work at a chemical firm in Louisville. Richard and Dr. Dorothy Green have two adult children, Richard Clayton and Kim Elizabeth and three grandchildren. Richard C. is a graduate of Stanford University and Kim a graduate of Northwestern University. Green returned to Concordia in 1969 as an assistant professor in the department of chemistry. He became the first director of the college’s new Office of Intercultural Affairs in 1971, helping to make Concordia a more welcoming place as Black and Native student enrollments increased under his leadership. Green served on the Board of Regents from 1972 to 1981 and aided Concordia College by acting as a mediator during the Black Student Strike of 1976. Green’s career followed numerous industry, faculty, administrative, and academic leadership posts across the nation, earning him the highest esteem as a respected and sought-out leader in higher education.

Fay Holmes Ferguson, a 1973 Concordia graduateBorn in La Porte, Indiana, offspring of a Lutheran household, Fay Holmes-Ferguson followed her faith tradition in attending Concordia College. As changes set in motion by the Civil Rights and Black Student Movements rippled through higher education, Holmes joined the first cohort of African American students on Concordia’s largely white campus. She graduated magna cum laude, going on to earn an M.B.A. degree from Indiana University. Holmes-Ferguson followed a successful career in advertising, eventually being named co-CEO at Burrell Communications Group, Chicago, Illinois. Ferguson joined Concordia’s Board of Regents in 2012. A gifted executive and community leader, Ferguson’s core life motto of leading a purpose-driven life focused on helping others, exemplifies the spirit and mission of Concordia College.